Age Separation: Volunteering Can Bridge the Gap

For the first time in U.S. history, people sixty and over now outnumber those 18 and younger. Yet we still live in a youth-centric culture that reinforces the separation of people based on age. Separation in the Workplace, in Our Neighborhoods and in Schools  Research suggests that workers over fifty have more than a 50% chance of being pushed out of their jobs before they are ready to leave. Hiring language like “energetic” and “enthusiastic” signal that certain workplaces belong to the young. Neighborhoods tend to be separated by age with “six in 10 leaning either young or old.”  We…

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Retirement: Over-Indulgences that Lead to Habits

My husband and I have a sweet 110+ pound Labrador Retriever.  When our dog, Ranger, developed a little ear infection, I took him to his veterinarian. The vet gave me a prescription for Ranger’s ear infection and a strong recommendation to quit overfeeding him. All I feed the dog is one cup of “fat dog” kibbles twice a day. Of course, I put a small amount of chicken breast on top of his food for flavor. I also feed him green beans for snacks—oh, and I do give him dog chews and dog treats after we take walks. And maybe…

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Live Your Best Life by Practicing This

Almost anyone can benefit from it, but a lot of people don’t recognize its value. It is free, but it often involves some effort to develop and retain it. Live a Longer, More Active Life This particular attribute is also associated with greater longevity. One study even suggested the people who nurture this are 11-15% more likely to “live longer overall.” Research suggests that older people who have this attribute develop fewer difficulties with tasks of daily living and mobility problems than their less optimistic peers. So, not only could we live longer but live better as a result of…

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Aging Realities: Knowledge is Power

Sometimes living in denial is easier than accepting reality. It took me a while to realize I wasn’t going to be “forever young.” I suspect that being in a state of denial is why research suggests a whole lot of people don’t adequately prepare financially, physically, or emotionally for the realities of getting older. But the truth is, all of us are getting older. Thankfully, I was initially pushed a bit to prepare. However, as I started educating myself about the realities of not only retirement but of aging, I became pretty motivated to start taking steps towards my best…

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Lifestyle, Aging, Gender & Alzheimer’s Disease

When we were younger, it was easier to convince ourselves that we were invincible. Some of us could push ourselves hard and feel like we could make up for lost sleep on the weekends. We could gorge on holiday foods and then drop extra weight by increasing our exercise and dieting for a short period. We could even enjoy a second glass of wine and handle it without question. But then, something changed. Aging and Gender As we are all aware, our bodies (and our metabolism) start changing after fifty. As we move into middle age and beyond, we also…

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“Elderly” is Not a Neutral Term

Shame on Writers Who Refer to Us as Elderly I’m truly tired of seeing headlines that refer to active, older adults as “elderly.” Even the style guide for the American Medical Association now recommends against using that pejorative term. Recently, I saw an article that Time.com ran using the term “elderly” to describe a seventy-five-year-old protester. Other publications referred to the protester as “older.” I contacted the editors at Time magazine about the recent article describing a protester as elderly.  I mentioned that the style guide for the American Medical Association advised against using the term “elderly” because it stereotyped groups…

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1968 and 2020: A Boomer Perspective

In a 2018 article, the Washington Post described it as “the year the center did not hold” and the year “many Americans saw their country spinning out of control. It was a shocking time, a moment of danger, destruction, and division—yet also a time of passion and possibility." It was also the year the Beatles released their top hit, “Hey Jude.” We Have a Valuable Perspective1968 was one of the most difficult years in American history and one that forever changed our country. For those of us who remember 1968 and/or the challenging years that followed, we have a unique…

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Racial Injustice: Protesting as an Older White Woman

During the past several days, I’ve seen images of young people all over the country protesting racial injustice and the brutal death of George Floyd. As an older female who remembers the 1960s, I’ve witnessed a lifetime of racism.  But until recently, I did not recognize the extent of my own “white privilege.” When a group of individuals organized a silent protest in my community, I knew that I needed to take a stand. Those with Hope and Those with Little I never thought much about enjoying certain privileges because I was born white. I grew up as a hard-scrabble,…

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